Marc Gellman

Rabbi Marc Gellman

Rabbi Gellman is the senior rabbi of Temple Beth Torah in Melville, New York, where he has served since 1981.

After receiving a B.A. from the University of Wisconsin in Madison with a major in Hebrew and Semitic studies in 1969, he completed his studies at the Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion by 1971. He was ordained by the college institute in 1972 and was awarded the senior homiletics prize. He was the youngest rabbi ever ordained by the seminary and completed the five-year program in two years of residency.

Rabbi Gellman received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from Northwestern University in 1981 and has taught at Antioch College, HUC-JIR New York, Northwestern University, Princeton University, Mt. Sinai Hospital, and other academic institutions. Rabbi Gellman served as chairman of the Medical Ethics Committee of the UJA Federation of New York and is a contributor to its Compendium of Jewish Medical Ethics. He has published widely and has contributed to a recent Commentary Magazine symposium on the state of Jewish belief. He also writes for Golf Digest, is a contributing editor to Moment Magazine, and has authored several children's books.

In addition to regular television appearances, Rabbi Gellman has served as chairman of the UJA rabbinical advisory committee, founding chairman of the Long Island Rabbinical Advisory Council, and president of the New York Board of Rabbis. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Tzedaka Award from the UMA-Federation and the Moshowitz Award for rabbinic excellence from the NYBR.

Rabbi Marc Gellman Samples

Transcendent experiences of God are real, and come in many forms

Q: This question is asked from a contemplative place in my heart after reading your recent column on atonement. A: Yes.

Atonement still calls for sacrifice - in the form of a changed heart

Q: In the Old Testament, there are passages regarding animal sacrifices as sin offerings. A: The sacrifice of animals was performed at many Temples in biblical times but was centralized in the Temple in Jerusalem by King Josiah in the 7th century.

Doing what you love is a blessing and a curse

The Jewish people are now in between the New Year, Rosh Hashana, and the Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur. For the occasion, I've condensed one of my New Year sermons.

Before condemning God for your losses, count your winnings

Q: After coming off the worst year of my life, I've reached the point that I feel there is no God as we know it. Religion always gives us a reason or a way out for everything. Instead, it's obvious there are NO miracles, favors or grace.

Despite supposed 'signs' from the dead, our best option is to accept death as an ending

Q: In a recent column, you mentioned how the time of death of a man's father showed up on a grandfather's clock when it stopped working several weeks later.

Despite the horrors of 9/11, or today horrors, freedom will win

I try not to think about 9/11 until it comes around each year. Even in the days just after the attacks, I found myself turning off the television after just a few minutes because the images of 9/11 were like staring at the sun.

Want to contact us?

800-637-4082

tcasales@tribune.com

Licensing and Reprints

TMS Licensing: We license popular cartoon characters, puzzles and content from renowned creators for print, interactive, TV and film, mobile and board games. TMS also licenses unique commentary in politics, travel, health, business and other categories.

TMS reprints: We grant websites, newsletters, books and other publications permission to reprint any of the 150-plus columns, cartoons, magazine articles, photos and graphics found in our catalog. This content also can be used in corporate communications and training materials.