Rex Huppke, Chicago Tribune columnist

Rex Huppke

Huppke began his career as a chemical engineer, but soon decided that making money wasn’t for him. Journalism seemed a reasonable path to poverty and, after earning a master’s degree from the University of Missouri Graduate School of Journalism, he launched his career working for the Associated Press in Indiana. Huppke wandered the state telling stories of national interest, and was one of ten media witnesses to the 2001 execution of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh.

In 2003, he joined the staff of the Chicago Tribune, writing about everything from gang violence and inner-city poverty to the glory of competitive arm wrestling and a southern Illinois town famous for its albino squirrels. His reporting and writing always honed in on the humanity of his subjects, feeding a passion for social justice and a relentless desire to speak for those whose voices often went unheard.

As he transitioned to column writing, Huppke found his penchant for humor an effective way of delivering opinions. In 2012, Huppke wrote a satirical obituary for facts: “Facts died Wednesday, April 18, after a long battle for relevancy with the 24-hour news cycle, blogs and the Internet.” That column was named one of Time Magazine’s Top 10 opinion pieces of the year.

He lives in the suburbs of Chicago with his wife, two sons and a 95-pound dog that he believes may be part cow.

Rex Huppke Samples

The female Thor sits down with human resources

Corporations eyeing the Supreme Court's recent ruling on Obamacare's contraception mandate might want to get their doors hammer-proofed -- there's a new god in town. Well, technically, there's a new comic god.

A future of endless bliss, thanks to Kickstarter

An Ohio man recently asked people on the Internet to give him money to make some potato salad.

Must knuckleheads speak for the rest of us Americans?

Got a busload of immigrant children? Got a problem with gun violence? Worried about the environment? Welcome to the drunk uncle-ization of America.

A questionnaire for the new age of corporate religiosity

The Supreme Court has now ruled that corporations are not just people, they are religious people whose beliefs must be respected.

Who will tame the crazy in the GOP?

President Barack Obama's favorability ratings are low, Iraq is collapsing, there's a humanitarian crisis brewing on our border with Mexico, and Hillary Clinton is making tone-deaf comments about her personal wealth.

The wisdom found in Owen's shadow

As school ends and parents furiously map out ways to keep their kiddos occupied over the summer, I think about Owen. Owen is a 6-year-old on my son's T-ball team. Earlier this season, he was in right field.

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